Welcome!

Eclipse Authors: Pat Romanski, Elizabeth White, Liz McMillan, David H Deans, JP Morgenthal

Related Topics: Java IoT, Eclipse

Java IoT: Article

Eclipse Special: Bill Dudney Looks at Eclipse M8 Close-Up

Eclipse Special: Bill Dudney Looks at Eclipse M8 Close-Up

  • To view our full selection of recent Eclipse stories click here

    As a kick off for this new column I figured I'd go over some of the good, bad and ugly in the new Eclipse M8 drop. I have been using M8 for two weeks now and I've accumulated a lot of notes of what I like and don't like in this latest of the drops before we get 3.0 final. Over all I am really impressed with this release. I went through the release notes and tried to comment on each aspect of what was documented as well as a couple of nice things that I found that are not in the release notes.

  • Eye-candy - in the form of new welcome stuff. I like the look of it and seems to be very useful for RCP based apps. Since I'm not writing any RCP apps I probably won't have to write anything to plugin into the new Welcome extensibility points it's nice to know it's there.

  • Cheat Sheets - very cool and very useful for doing long winded stuff like creating a session facade or something like that. I got to see an example of this at Eclipse Con back in February in the form of a demo from the IBM WebSphere folks. The cheat sheet guided you through the whole process of building a Web service. All you had to do was type in a couple of names and a URL or two and bang you had a Web service stub that only needed business logic. For tool vendors this will be a big win.

  • Workspace Selection on startup is very nice esp for OSX users, instead of digging into the Info.plist file or cons'n up your own shell script to start Eclipse you get a bit of UI complete with a browse button. I tend to be a different breed of user and install multiple versions of Eclipse though because I'm doing weird stuff like comparing different versions of plugins and stuff like that.

  • Tear Off Views - Sounds like a cool feature for people that don't like the "everything in one window" UI. Only avaiaible on GTK and Windows though. Another thing that ticks me off about SWT. If the UI were Swing based then it would be available everywhere. There seems to be quite a bit of complaining about SWT these days. Dion Almaer of The Server Side posts this in response to another blog complaining about SWT here.

  • Collapse Views - I like this very much. It was available in M7 if you moved to the new LAF so I have been using it for quite a while.

  • Multi-Tab Scalability - I love this feature! I usually keep the default of having multiple tabs but I like having only one tab as well. I absolutely love the switch buffer support though, kind of like C-x C-b in Emacs, now if we could just get the Emacs key bindings to work :-)

  • Manual Build - very cool, esp 'build working set' to only build your project and the projects it depends on. This is very useful when building an Eclipse plugins that is broken up into multiple projects, or really any multi-project environment.

  • Background Processing Maturing - tabs now indicate via font when a background process is going on. This is a nice addition. The background processing is great in general and it's really nice to see it maturing.

  • Key Bindings work in Dialogs - another thing that makes me mad about SWT. Swing based apps always worked with the key bindings defined for text on OSX even the Emacs key bindings work in all text fields, modal or not.

  • Virtual Tables - cool but again makes me mad that there is an SWT, Swing had this fixed much earlier.

  • New Searching - very cool, I've recently been doing some work on myFaces and I've been using the search stuff a lot. I really like it, esp the group results according to package an other stuff like that.

  • Synchronization problems reports - very cool feature. Basically allows the sync to report problems that will result if you just do a simple update and commit. In other words – it will show you before you do it that you commit will break the build. Now if only we could get people to use it :-)

  • Ant - problems now show in the problem view, nice touch. The Ant team did a great job of maturing the Ant support all together, hats off to them. Much earlier (M4 or M5 I think) there was a discussion around providing some refactorings for the Ant editor. I'm not sure where that is but I think this feature has been deferred till after 3.0. It would be very cool to see refactoring support though, imagine being able to rename a target without having to do a search and replace…

  • Ant - template support like the Java editor's 'sep' for System.err.println’ Support is early though and I've not had a chance to dig into it so I don't know how configurable it is. Another sign that the Ant editor is really maturing.

  • Java Editor - quick outline now shows inherited members in a different font

  • Java Editor - refactorings now update Java Doc without forcing an preview. I believe this has to do with the rework of the underlying Java model to include the Javadoc as a first class citizen. There is a cool AST viewer available as a plugin as part of this work too.

  • Java - User Defined Libraries - group needed jar files and refer to them with a name that can live at a different path for different users, very nice - also has a quick fix for users that are importing your project but don't have the library defined, cool! This is a great feature for doing things like adding Easymock to your project (anything that requires multiple jar files to work).

  • Debugger - new value popups are very cool indeed, you can see the values for stuff right there without the variables view.

  • Debug - Assign values in the variable view, no longer have to go to the expression view . This is a very cool feature. I recently had to go back to 2.1.x to write a plugin and did not realize how much I'd miss this feature untill it was gone.

  • Package View - Context Menu now contains Run menu, I love this and have been meaning to put in a feature request for it for a long time. I'm sure glad someone did.

  • Refactoring - launch configurations finally support refactorings, I hated renaming a test class cause my JUnit launch config got hosed, no longer. If my memory serves me correctly this is part of opening up the refactoring code so that other plugins can participate in the refactoring. From what I remember we are even going to be able to write our own refactorings.

    Well that's about it for this inaugural installment. I hope you're enjoying M8 as much as I am. Please feel free to contact me here or look for more info on my blog.

  • More Stories By Bill Dudney

    Bill Dudney is Editor-in-Chief of Eclipse Developer's Journal and serves too as JDJ's Eclipse editor. He is a Practice Leader with Virtuas Solutions and has been doing Java development since late 1996 after he downloaded his first copy of the JDK. Prior to Virtuas, Bill worked for InLine Software on the UML bridge that tied UML Models in Rational Rose and later XMI to the InLine suite of tools. Prior to getting hooked on Java he built software on NeXTStep (precursor to Apple's OSX). He has roughly 15 years of distributed software development experience starting at NASA building software to manage the mass properties of the Space Shuttle.

    Comments (14)

    Share your thoughts on this story.

    Add your comment
    You must be signed in to add a comment. Sign-in | Register

    In accordance with our Comment Policy, we encourage comments that are on topic, relevant and to-the-point. We will remove comments that include profanity, personal attacks, racial slurs, threats of violence, or other inappropriate material that violates our Terms and Conditions, and will block users who make repeated violations. We ask all readers to expect diversity of opinion and to treat one another with dignity and respect.


    IoT & Smart Cities Stories
    While the focus and objectives of IoT initiatives are many and diverse, they all share a few common attributes, and one of those is the network. Commonly, that network includes the Internet, over which there isn't any real control for performance and availability. Or is there? The current state of the art for Big Data analytics, as applied to network telemetry, offers new opportunities for improving and assuring operational integrity. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jim Frey, Vice President of S...
    Rodrigo Coutinho is part of OutSystems' founders' team and currently the Head of Product Design. He provides a cross-functional role where he supports Product Management in defining the positioning and direction of the Agile Platform, while at the same time promoting model-based development and new techniques to deliver applications in the cloud.
    @CloudEXPO and @ExpoDX, two of the most influential technology events in the world, have hosted hundreds of sponsors and exhibitors since our launch 10 years ago. @CloudEXPO and @ExpoDX New York and Silicon Valley provide a full year of face-to-face marketing opportunities for your company. Each sponsorship and exhibit package comes with pre and post-show marketing programs. By sponsoring and exhibiting in New York and Silicon Valley, you reach a full complement of decision makers and buyers in ...
    There are many examples of disruption in consumer space – Uber disrupting the cab industry, Airbnb disrupting the hospitality industry and so on; but have you wondered who is disrupting support and operations? AISERA helps make businesses and customers successful by offering consumer-like user experience for support and operations. We have built the world’s first AI-driven IT / HR / Cloud / Customer Support and Operations solution.
    As data explodes in quantity, importance and from new sources, the need for managing and protecting data residing across physical, virtual, and cloud environments grow with it. Managing data includes protecting it, indexing and classifying it for true, long-term management, compliance and E-Discovery. Commvault can ensure this with a single pane of glass solution – whether in a private cloud, a Service Provider delivered public cloud or a hybrid cloud environment – across the heterogeneous enter...
    LogRocket helps product teams develop better experiences for users by recording videos of user sessions with logs and network data. It identifies UX problems and reveals the root cause of every bug. LogRocket presents impactful errors on a website, and how to reproduce it. With LogRocket, users can replay problems.
    Data Theorem is a leading provider of modern application security. Its core mission is to analyze and secure any modern application anytime, anywhere. The Data Theorem Analyzer Engine continuously scans APIs and mobile applications in search of security flaws and data privacy gaps. Data Theorem products help organizations build safer applications that maximize data security and brand protection. The company has detected more than 300 million application eavesdropping incidents and currently secu...
    Rafay enables developers to automate the distribution, operations, cross-region scaling and lifecycle management of containerized microservices across public and private clouds, and service provider networks. Rafay's platform is built around foundational elements that together deliver an optimal abstraction layer across disparate infrastructure, making it easy for developers to scale and operate applications across any number of locations or regions. Consumed as a service, Rafay's platform elimi...
    The Internet of Things is clearly many things: data collection and analytics, wearables, Smart Grids and Smart Cities, the Industrial Internet, and more. Cool platforms like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Intel's Galileo and Edison, and a diverse world of sensors are making the IoT a great toy box for developers in all these areas. In this Power Panel at @ThingsExpo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists discussed what things are the most important, which will have the most profound e...
    In today's enterprise, digital transformation represents organizational change even more so than technology change, as customer preferences and behavior drive end-to-end transformation across lines of business as well as IT. To capitalize on the ubiquitous disruption driving this transformation, companies must be able to innovate at an increasingly rapid pace.